Graduate Student Musicologists Break Into the Field

Two musicology students have recently had exciting achievements and experiences:

Ph.D. candidate Jessica Kizzire has a chapter titled “‘The Place I’ll Return to Someday’: Musical Nostalgia in Final Fantasy IX” in the recently published Music in Video Games: Studying Play (Routledge, 2014). The collection is edited by K.J. Donnelly, William Gibbons, and Neil Lerner. This chapter foreshadows her dissertation research, which involves video game music. Congratulations on this publication, Jessica!

Ph.D student Sarah Lucas recently travelled to Hungary for research concerning Bèla Bartók. Sarah worked in the Budapest Bartók Archive with the support of a Stanley Award for Graduate Research, where she examined correspondence between Bartók and his publisher, Universal Edition, regarding the first edition of his first Piano Concerto (1926). Sarah also had the opportunity to study several early versions of the score. Sarah has presented papers on Bartók and his music, with a special emphasis on the reception during his first concert tour of the United States (1927-1928), at AMS Midwest and at graduate student conferences at the University of Iowa and the University of Missouri. Congratulations on your award and this exciting research project, Sarah!

Advertisements

Matthew Arndt wins David Kraehenbuehl Prize

Matthew Arndt has been named the 2010–2011 recipient of the David Kraehenbuehl Prize, which is a $2,000 award for the best article in the Journal of Music Theory over a two-year period by an untenured author. The Prize is awarded by a committee of three external reviewers who are senior music theorists. The committee reports: “Focusing on Schenker’s and Schoenberg’s Harmonielehren, Arndt argues that conflicts in their theories of composition result from a mere difference in emphasis within their shared conception of the tone. The argument arises from a magisterial command of two recent interpretive approaches: integration theory and metaphor theory. The result is a hermeneutical tour de force with its own unique methodological blend.”

Composer Aaron Perrine (PhD, composition, 2014) wins prestigious Sousa-Ostwald Award

Aaron Perrine–who successfully defended his dissertation and graduated with a Ph.D. in composition in Spring 2014–recently won the prestigious Sousa-Ostwald Award from the American Bandmasters Association for his 2013 wind ensemble composition Pale Blue On Deep. The award, which carries a cash prize of $5,000, is a highly selective honor that places Perrine in the company of some of the most accomplished wind ensemble composers active today, including John Mackey, Michael Daugherty, Donald Grantham, Dan Welcher, Anthony Iannaccone, Yo Goto, and Michael Gandolfi.

Perrine, who is a previous winner of the also highly competitive Outstanding TA Award from the University of Iowa, will begin a tenure-track job as Assistant Professor at Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa in Fall 2014.
Congratulations on your many successes, Aaron!!