Musicology students receive fellowships

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Two doctoral students in musicology have recently been awarded fellowships. Jessica Kizzire will receive the University of Iowa’s Ballard Seashore Fellowship, which provides “protected and supported time” for doctoral candidates to focus on their research and the writing of their dissertations. Jessica will be completing “Hearing Wonderland: Aural Adaptation and Carroll’s Classic Tale,” in which she will critically examine the role of sound in multimedia adaptations of Lewis Carroll’s story in film, ballet, and other multimedia formats.

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Michele Aichele has been awarded an American Association of University Women (AAUW) American Dissertation Fellowship. The AAUW, founded in 1881, is dedicated to promoting equity and education for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy, and research. In her dissertation, “Cécile Chaminade (1857–1944) and ‘The New Woman’ in the United States,” Michele considers why the composer’s music became so popular, inspiring hundreds of American Chaminade music clubs, and explores how traditional female roles related to and conflicted with Chaminade’s public persona and career.

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UIowans present at Iowa Musicology Day

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University of Iowa students and faculty traveled to Drake University in Des Moines to present papers at the second Iowa Musicology Day on Saturday, March 26. The topics of their research included film music, the music of German POWs in Iowa, The Tempest by Frank Martin, and an early female conductor, the Countess of Radnor.  Professor Marian Wilson Kimber chaired the program committee for the event.

Pictured are Kelsey McGinnis, Prof. Nathan Platte, Tim Cuffman, Elissa Kana, and Jared Hedges.  (Not pictured: Philip Rudd.)

Sarah Lucas Awarded Fulbright

Sarah Lucas, a Ph.D. student in musicology, has won a U.S. Student Fulbright Award to conduct dissertation research at the Béla Bartók Archive and National Széchényi Library in Budapest, Hungary, during the 2016–2017 academic year. Through her research, which also includes study of conductor Fritz Reiner’s conducting scores and correspondence in the United States, Sarah seeks to explore the details of the connection between composer Béla Bartók and Reiner, as well as the effects of their professional association on Bartók’s compositions and their reception in the U.S.  Congratulations Sarah!

Hungarian Institute of Musicology 2014

2016 Iowa Musicology Day Program

Prof. Eric Saylor  will host the annual Iowa Musicology Day conference at Drake University in Des Moines on Saturday, March 26, between 9 and 5:30 in Room 204 of the Fine Arts Center.  The conference brings together musicologists and students from Iowa schools to share their research.  All are welcome to attend.

9–10:30 Early Music

Marian Wilson Kimber (University of Iowa), chair

Alison Altstatt, (University of Northern Iowa), “Beating the Bounds: The Rogation Processions at Wilton Abbey”

Beth Zamzow (Kirkwood Community College), “Modal Mingling and Liturgical Quotation: A Fresh Look at the Fifteenth-Century English Carols

Melanie Batoff (Luther College), “Uncovering the Origins and Purpose of the German Visitatio sepulchri Liturgical Drama”

10:45–11:45 Women in Music

Melinda Boyd (University of Northern Iowa), chair

Haley Steele (University of Northern Iowa), “Estelle Liebling: A Biographical and Pedagogical Survey”

Philip Rudd (University of Iowa), “Lady Helen of Radnor: Countess, Conductor, Pioneer”

11:45–12:30 Keynote, Christopher M. Scheer (Utah State University)

Introduced by Eric Saylor (Drake University)

1:45–2:45 Interpretations

Melanie Batoff (Luther College), chair

MaKayla M. McDonald (University of Northern Iowa), “An Analysis of Errollyn Wallen’s Are you worried about the rising cost of funerals?

Jared Hedges (University of Iowa), “Ekphrasis and Frank Martin’s Aesthetic Ethic in Der Sturm

2:45–3:45 Music and Communities

Beth Zamzow (Kirkwood Community College), chair

Andrew Tubbs (Wartburg College), “Cripface: Disability Narratives in Sound”

Kelsey McGinnis (University of Iowa), “The Purest Pieces of Home: German POWs Making German Music in America”

4–5:30 Film Music

Alison Altstatt, (University of Northern Iowa), chair

Tim Cuffman (University of Iowa), “Musical Characterization of Evil in Three Shanes”

Elissa Kane (University of Iowa), “The Cohesive Function of John Corigliano’s Chaconne in The Red Violin”

Nathan Platte (University of Iowa), “Max Steiner’s Four Daughters? Paternity, Adoption, and the Trouble with Onscreen Orchestrators”

 

Anchiskhati Choir to Visit

anchiskhati picture.jpgA quartet of the Anchiskhati Choir, the world’s foremost practitioners of Georgian traditional choral music, is visiting Iowa City on February 25–26. The visit is the first stop of a US tour connected with a symposium at Yale University.

According to John Graham of Yale University, “members of the Anchiskhati Choir come from different regions of Georgia where they have absorbed the unique singing traditions of their parents and grandparents. Singing weekly in the famous sixth-century Anchiskhati church in Tbilisi, Georgia, the group collaborates as a group of expert and passionate ethnomusicologists, who teach, hold workshops and regularly perform in Georgia and abroad.” Since 1988, the group has been at the forefront of a revival of Georgian traditional three-voice chant, which was eradicated at the beginning of the twentieth century. Their chanting is informed by intensive study of original recordings and transcriptions from that period. “The precision of timbre, tuning, and other nuances of authentic practice in an Anchiskhati performance yield an exquisite blend of ethereal Orthodox prayer text with the hearty enthusiasm of the Caucasian folk-singing style.”

On February 25 at 4:30 pm, they will give a lecture-demonstration entitled “An Introduction to Georgian Traditional Music” at the University Capitol Center Recital Hall (1670 UCC) in Old Capitol Town Centre, assisted by Matthew Arndt of the University of Iowa School of Music. That evening at 7:30 pm, the group will give a concert of secular and sacred music featuring traditional instruments at St. Raphael Orthodox Church, 722 East College Street, followed by a reception with Georgian food. Both events are free and open to the public. Donations will be accepted at the concert and reception. On February 26, the singers will visit choruses at three high schools in town: City, West, and Regina.

The invited representatives of the choir are Davit Shughliashvili, Zaal Tsereteli, Levan Veshapidze, and Davit Zatiashvili. The visit is co-sponsored by the University of Iowa School of Music, the University of Iowa Department of Religious Studiesthe University of Iowa Department of Religious Studies, International Programs, the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies, Arts Share, and the Antiochian Orthodox Diocese of the Midwest.

Recent Faculty Activities

EMHIowa faculty have recently been active in publishing scholarship, presenting papers, and developing new pedagogies. Christine Getz’s “Canonizing San Carlo: Sermonizing, the Sounding Word, and Image Construction in the Polyphony for San Carlo,” was published in the 2015 edition of Early Music History. This essay examines the role of the hymns, the sacred polyphony by Vincenzo Pellegrini and Andrea Cima, and the spiritual madrigals of Giovanni Battista Porta in promoting the officially sanctioned image of Carlo Borromeo after his elevation to the status of ‘beato’ and following his canonisation.

9780199321285Trevor Harvey’s chapter, “Avatar Rockstars: Constructing Musical Personae in Virtual Worlds,” about music in Second Life, was just published in The Oxford Handbook of Music and Virtuality, edited by Sheila Whiteley and Shara Rambarran.

 

Booklet.qxd The CD, Brazilian Dreams: Music of Michael Eckert, was released in the fall of 2015 on MSR Classics MS1549. It includes Three Chôros, Three Pieces in Brazilian Style, Three for the Road, Three Scenes (Amanda McCandless, clarinet; Polina Khatsko, piano); Three Tangos, and Three Pieces for Two Pianos (The Unison Duo). Michael Eckert has also published a review of Ben Earle, Luigi Dallapiccola and Musical Modernism in Fascist Italy in The Journal of Musicological Research 34 (2015): 352-354.

main-qimg-c771a5403bc222f78ac025aece5e14f9Jennifer Iverson gave a talk in January 2016 at CCRMA, The Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics at Stanford University, one of the foremost computer-music centers in the world. The talk, “Invisible Collaboration: The Dawn of Electronic Music at the WDR” is available on YouTube.

Tom_Quad_9139In January, Marian Wilson Kimber presented a paper, “Women’s Musical Readings and the Canon: Genre, Performance, and the ‘Work’ Concept,” at an interdisciplinary conference, Women and the Canon, at Christ Church, Oxford University. The paper explored the historical position of a rare women’s genre, the musical reading, for spoken word and piano.

Matthew Arndt was awarded an Innovations in Teaching with Technology Award from Iowa’s College and Liberal Arts and Sciences for his project, “New Tools for Musicianship and Theory Pedagogy,” which enhances undergraduate theory pedagogy through a program called SmartMusic and an app, Anki.

 

 

Reviewing Film Music Research

Gregory Newbold, an MA student in musicology, spent the summer of 2015 reading five recent titles from the Film Score Guide series (Scarecrow Press). His review, just published in the Winter 2016 Society for American Music Bulletin, surveys research on an array of film composers and titles, including The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, A Streetcar Named Desire, The Godfather trilogy, Forbidden Planet, and The Adventures of Robin Hood. Newbold is now writing a “film score guide” of his own: his in-progress thesis contemplates Benjamin Frankel’s music for Curse of the Werewolf.

Fall 2015 Lecture Circuit

Here’s a run-down of the papers that musicology and theory faculty and students are delivering this fall:

DunbarDouglassRecital_1901Marian Wilson Kimber presented a paper, “Li’l Brown Baby: Paul Laurence Dunbar, Dialect Verse, and Musically-Accompanied Recitation by Women” at the fall meeting of the Midwest Chapter of the American Musicological Society in Chicago.  The paper explored the use of music in the spoken-word performances of the African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar, and role that the widespread popularity of his poetry with female elocutionists and composers played in its reception. Historical Dunbar and Douglass poster courtesy Ohio History Center, Columbus Ohio.

Cage ca. 1950

Cage ca. 1950

Jennifer Iverson presented a paper, “Preparing Electronic Music” at the national meeting of the Society for Music Theory in St. Louis. The paper explored the reception of John Cage‘s prepared piano music in West Germany between 1952-54. Before the aleatory debates of the later 1950s, Cage’s prepared piano had a profound effect on both the sound and the temporal structure of early WDR electronic music.

 

Kelsey McGinnis

Kelsey McGinnis

Kelsey McGinnis, a PhD student in musicology, gave a presentation titled “Intersections: Music, Human Rights, and Cultural Diplomacy in an Iowa POW Camp” at the International Symposium on Cultural Diplomacy in the United Nations. The conference was hosted at the United Nations headquarters and other UN consulates in New York, bringing together academic and political professionals. Kelsey presented her work on the musical activities of German POWs in Iowa during WWII as a case study in the history of U.S. cultural diplomacy.